vocabulary

The Latest

Jun 19, 2012

Trying my best to say Parangaricutirimicuaro!

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Alcahueta!
It’s one of the most offensive words you could use to describe a comadre, as I learned not too long ago.  Then again it’s also one of our favorite words to make fun of ourselves with.  ¡Alcahueta! 
Good usage: Hay ando yo de alcahueta p’arriba y p’abajo y ni siquiera me había dado cuentade lo que andaban haciendo… (There I am going with them  here and there and I didn’t even know what they were doing)
Bad usage:  Esa tipa, she’s always trying to get you to do things… ¡Alcahueta!  Read More
Apr 10, 2012

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Alcahueta!

It’s one of the most offensive words you could use to describe a comadre, as I learned not too long ago.  Then again it’s also one of our favorite words to make fun of ourselves with.  ¡Alcahueta! 

Good usage: Hay ando yo de alcahueta p’arriba y p’abajo y ni siquiera me había dado cuentade lo que andaban haciendo… (There I am going with them  here and there and I didn’t even know what they were doing)

Bad usage:  Esa tipa, she’s always trying to get you to do things… ¡Alcahueta!  Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Chale! ¡Huevón! ¡A Toda Madre!
This one is three-fer… as in three for one!  You know us mexicanos love a great deal.  Well, you all have been sharing so many great mexi-vocabulario words lately that it only made sense to do more than just one on this time around.
So, consider this the “blue-light” special of mexi-vocabulario! Read More
Apr 4, 2012 / 1 note

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Chale! ¡Huevón! ¡A Toda Madre!

This one is three-fer… as in three for one!  You know us mexicanos love a great deal.  Well, you all have been sharing so many great mexi-vocabulario words lately that it only made sense to do more than just one on this time around.

So, consider this the “blue-light” special of mexi-vocabulario! Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Guey/Wuey!
By far.  By very far!  This single word is the one that non-Spanish speakers always ask me about the most.  It never fails.  As soon as language comes up as a topic of conversation.  Specifically popular words used by Mexicans in Spanish here in Texas, the following question usually follows: What does that word mean that all Mexican guys use… it’s like “way” or “woo-ay”?  Is it a bad word? Read More
Mar 27, 2012 / 1 note

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Guey/Wuey!

By far.  By very far!  This single word is the one that non-Spanish speakers always ask me about the most.  It never fails.  As soon as language comes up as a topic of conversation.  Specifically popular words used by Mexicans in Spanish here in Texas, the following question usually follows: What does that word mean that all Mexican guys use… it’s like “way” or “woo-ay”?  Is it a bad word? Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Rifandomela!
As in rifar,to risk it, put it all on the line, or to arriesgarse.  You might have heard the expression arriesgarse el pellejo.  That’s one of those phrases we grew up with, usually when guys were sitting around drinking some beers and shooting the breeze.  It always made whatever anecdote they were relaying seem so much more daring and impressive.  Even when that cuento might have been a fib, or at the very least partially made up, it still sounded bien macho when they threw in the words arriesgandome el pellejo.  ¡Me la estuve rifando bien feo! Read More
Mar 21, 2012

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Rifandomela!

As in rifar,to risk it, put it all on the line, or to arriesgarse.  You might have heard the expression arriesgarse el pellejo.  That’s one of those phrases we grew up with, usually when guys were sitting around drinking some beers and shooting the breeze.  It always made whatever anecdote they were relaying seem so much more daring and impressive.  Even when that cuento might have been a fib, or at the very least partially made up, it still sounded bien macho when they threw in the words arriesgandome el pellejo.  ¡Me la estuve rifando bien feo! Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Chusma!
Chusma, as in “muchedumbre de gente vulgar” (crowd of vulgar people), as defined by the Real Academia Española… is probably best interpreted for meaning by one of the countless encounters between Don Ramón and Doña Florinda on El Chavo del Ocho, where Quico, of course, was always the culprit behind their ongoing bickering.  In fact, chusma is one of those words that can easily be understood even if you don’t speak a lick of Spanish. Read More
Mar 13, 2012 / 5 notes

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Chusma!

Chusma, as in “muchedumbre de gente vulgar” (crowd of vulgar people), as defined by the Real Academia Española… is probably best interpreted for meaning by one of the countless encounters between Don Ramón and Doña Florinda on El Chavo del Ocho, where Quico, of course, was always the culprit behind their ongoing bickering.  In fact, chusma is one of those words that can easily be understood even if you don’t speak a lick of Spanish. Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Pipirisnais!
De la high… o sea de la alta sociedad.
The word pipirisnais is not in the dictionary.  That’s what you’ll get if you search the Real Academia Española’s website for a definition of this Mexican term.  Like many of our palabras, which one way or another have somehow gained popularity and an unofficial universal acceptance within our cultura for what they mean, pipirisnais is one of those words that cannot be very easily defined.
Therefore, probably the best way to express what pipirisnais means is to explain how or when it would likely be used. Read More
Mar 6, 2012 / 2 notes

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Pipirisnais!

De la high… o sea de la alta sociedad.

The word pipirisnais is not in the dictionary.  That’s what you’ll get if you search the Real Academia Española’s website for a definition of this Mexican term.  Like many of our palabras, which one way or another have somehow gained popularity and an unofficial universal acceptance within our cultura for what they mean, pipirisnais is one of those words that cannot be very easily defined.

Therefore, probably the best way to express what pipirisnais means is to explain how or when it would likely be used. Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: Solovino
Looking back, it’s funny how many dogs have actually come into my life all by themselves over the years… earning the only proper Mexican name one can give such a canine: ¡Solovino!  
Solovino because, as the name implies, these perros have showed up at our doorsteps all by themselves and regardless of how much we might have tried to run them off at the beginning, they somehow always manage to stay, for as long as theywant to, and win our hearts over. Read More
Mar 2, 2012

Mexi-Vocabulario: Solovino

Looking back, it’s funny how many dogs have actually come into my life all by themselves over the years… earning the only proper Mexican name one can give such a canine: ¡Solovino!  

Solovino because, as the name implies, these perros have showed up at our doorsteps all by themselves and regardless of how much we might have tried to run them off at the beginning, they somehow always manage to stay, for as long as theywant to, and win our hearts over. Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: Arrullar
Arrullar.  To put one to sleep.  Or in this tertiary definition on WordReference.com, which by the way is my favorite, it means to enamorar con palabras dulces (to make one fall in love with sweet words).  ¡Ay caray! ¡Qué románticon! Read More
Mar 2, 2012

Mexi-Vocabulario: Arrullar

Arrullar.  To put one to sleep.  Or in this tertiary definition on WordReference.com, which by the way is my favorite, it means to enamorar con palabras dulces (to make one fall in love with sweet words).  ¡Ay caray! ¡Qué románticon! Read More

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Mitotero!
A ver, so… yo por andar de mitotero ¡mira nada más de lo que me enteré!
Mitotero, the only word in that sentence that stood out to me.  Mostly in telenovelasand variety shows is where I’ve heard it before since at our house metiche andchismoso were much more common.  And apparently there are a couple of different definitions of what exactly mitotero means. Read More
Feb 3, 2012

Mexi-Vocabulario: ¡Mitotero!

A ver, so… yo por andar de mitotero ¡mira nada más de lo que me enteré!

Mitotero, the only word in that sentence that stood out to me.  Mostly in telenovelasand variety shows is where I’ve heard it before since at our house metiche andchismoso were much more common.  And apparently there are a couple of different definitions of what exactly mitotero means. Read More